How a plywood recycling bin came about.
 

At dwiss we're focused on the sustainable use of natural resources, the impact this has on the environment and subsequently peoples’ lives.

We partner with people that share our values to develop sustainable products and services that enable sustainable behaviours.  Our launch product is the dwiss - a sustainably made bin that makes recycling quick and easy.

 

The aim of our approach is to minimise humanity’s ecological footprint so that the Earth can continue to provide a healthy environment for current and future generations.


 

Why?

dwiss exists to help humankind shift to a more sustainable position on the use of natural resources.  We do this because we believe that everybody deserves a fair chance in life, and that a healthy environment is a key part of this.  The sustainable use of natural resources contributes to a healthy environment by enhancing biodiversity, reducing energy consumption and avoiding waste entering our land and oceans.


 

Who?

dwiss was founded by Jon Walker to realise an idea he had whilst working as an Environmental Manager over 10 years ago.  Jon recognised the ecological, social and economic value of recycling and so began doing what he could at home.  He soon found he had piles, bags and boxes of different waste types scattered around the kitchen and so sought a recycling unit that worked well, looked good and was itself sustainable. Disappointed with the options available Jon developed the initial idea for the dwiss.

Jon partnered a number of organisations and individuals to develop the award winning dwiss, including:

  • Design Futures, a design consultancy based within Sheffield Hallam University (SHU),

  • Folkes 3D Printing, who brought their knowledge of 3D printing into play for prototyping,

  • Paul Timmer, a Dutch designer / maker experienced in working with wood, who lead the development of the dwiss' form and function,

  • and Alex Swain of British design brand ByAlex, who worked with Jon on the functional detailing.

To help make the dwiss available to all Jon is working with Godrej & Boyce, an Indian manufacturing company that is looking to find a use for its surplus materials.  We'll share more details about this project in due course.

These are the main players in the dwiss' development so far but there have been many other individuals and organisations (not least Ben Giles, James Brown, Blueshift Video, Jack Austen and My Fathers Heart who have created the wonderful imagery) that have made significant contributions along the way, including all the incredibly kind folk that supported dwiss' crowdfunding campaign.  The generosity of the following people provided the momentum needed to move the dwiss into production:

Glen Gunawan, Melissa Hine, Georgina Brøndal, Amanda Humphreys, Justin Byrne,

Richard Brass, Ralph Clark, Diane Mondini, Adam Esposito, Madi Robinson, Jon Jackson, Jamie Veitch, Tim Wheeler, Luke Rowland, Philippa Debono, Sarah Wright, 

Nikki Davison, Duncan Allott, Charles Bishop, Lisa Madden, Amanda Brown, 

Caer and James Harrison, Laura Grant, Steve Taylor, Linda Allinson, Helen Lawson, 

Heidi Ravenscroft, Seán Wood, Chris Lowe, Phil Turner, John Wray, Adam Shaw, 

Elaine Richardson, Asif Majid, Lawrence Tai See, Lisa Pogson, Matthew Colton,

Jean Walker, Ashley Walker, Russ Parks, Jaime Walker, Martin Webb, Louisa Harrison-Walker, James Dykes, Stuart, Rachel Fraser

It really has been a collaborative effort, thank you all.


 

Outcomes over Outputs

Whilst the dwiss is a tangible output of this journey the real successes lie with the outcomes, such as:

  • shifting us towards a more sustainable position on the use of natural resources,

  • raising awareness of the circular economy and the sustainability credentials of the products we purchase,

  • providing hands on work experience for students.

Join the dwiss team by signing up to our newsletter and find out more about what we’re doing on sustainable resource use and how you can get involved.